Familien Strikketreff at Egmont

Another weekend, another knitting event, this time organised by the Norwegian magazine Familien held at their offices at Egmont at Nydalen in Oslo. This is the third time it is organised but the first time I was able to hold workshops here since it has coincided with Strikkehelgen in Stavanger. My workshop Smart Knitting Techniques was sold out in a day, so I was asked to hold a second one the same day. Both where overbooked and with more knitters wanting to join on the day. 135 women were attending the day at Egmont, where the day consisted of 2 presentations, strikkekino/knitting cinema, a small market hall, 2 different workshops and idea groups. Above you see the canteen filled with knitters.

I listened to Kari Hestnes’ presentation and she spotted me. I had to come up on the stage and was an example of a body type with a long back. That was fun! I also had the opportunity to talk to the following designers who had stand in the market area (read: reception): Sidsel Høivik, Kristin Wiola Ødegård, Vanja Blix Langsrud, May Britt Bjella Zamori, and Anne-Stine Thuve. I enjoyed talking to knitters I know and new ones I had not met before as well as the Familien crew.

Here is Wiolastrikk, aka Kristin Wiola Ødegård’s stand, with her last book cover: Lek med tradisjoner on display. She is at the back to the left talking to Kari.

All their special magazines were displayed in the meeting room area, where the workshop and the knitting cinema took place.

I was also photographed in action by event photographer Martine Kolstad during my workshop. I am demonstrating making a double hem using the cable cast on. I am wearing my design: Keya Shrug and Keya Scarf.Here is one of the knitters wearing the popular Wiolakofta designed by Kristin Wiola Ødegård, captured by photographer Martine Kolstad. If you are on Facebook you will find several video made on the day, on the Familien page here: familien.egmont. On Friday, I am flying to Stavanger, south west Norway for the next and last set of workshops this fall for Strikkehelgen i Stavanger. Maybe I will see you there?

 

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Share

Familien Julens Småstrikk 2016

julens-smastrikk-2Chrismas is coming, and you can see it in the magazines in Norway. The special issue published by Familien called Familien Julens Småstrikk features accessories and small projects for Christmas including two of my designs: Keya Scarf and Maith. I am delighted to have my designs included in this packed issue with a total of 107 patterns. The photos are of the gorgeous Alexandria Eissinger, with hair & make up by Sissel Fylling and jewellery by Kaja Gjedebo Design is brilliantly captured by Eivind Røhne.

16_no_fao_7_flettestrikk_98521_page_2My spreads of pages is introduced with the heading “Fin med fletter”/Nice with cables. Keya Scarf: Voluminus hidden sand cables in a tweed mixture made of Rowan Lima and Rowan Fine Tweed held together, creates a divine texture for this reversible scarf, called Keya after the bloom of a flower.

16_no_fao_7_flettestrikk_98521_page_3Maith: Divine silk and gracious cables give this shrug a feeling of goodness just as the old Irish word ”maith”. The shrug is worked from one sleeve cuff, across the back to the opposite sleeve cuff. Knit a cowl and use it as a collar on the shrug. Rowan Truesilk gives you a luxurious feeling and makes it perfect even for evening wear.

16_no_fao_7_flettestrikk_98521_page_4The magazine is available in selected supermarkets and at newsagents in Norway,  if you live abroad you can order the magazine by e-mailing Kari.Bachke@egmont.com. I am fascinated to see that the number of Christmas issues with knitting patterns are increasing here in Norway. One reason might be the recent research paper by SIFO  that found an astonishing 43% of women in Norway knit.

Share

Photoshoot at Ekeberg Restaurant: Keya Shrug & Scarf

20151028 LM Ekeberg 0945Texture addiction is the key word for this design. I love how the colors came all together at the photoshoot. Photographer Eivind Røhne suggested we use the staircase on the side of the restaurant, and the result blew my mind again! To wear Keya with a pair of camel colored silk trousers was make up and hair artist Sissel Fylling’s advice since the wedding gowns looked to white against the sand colored shrug and scarf. Gorgeous model Alexandria Eissinger is wearing Keya Shrug with and without the extra back piece and the Keya Scarf as a collar as well as jewelry by Kaja Gjedebo Design. The Norwegian pattern will be published on Ravelry at the end of February as soon as I receive the pattern back from my Tech Editor. The English pattern will be test knitted in my Ravelry group before its release.

20151028 LM Ekeberg 1014I knitted the scarf while I was waiting for sponsored yarn to arrive from Permin, Rowan’s agent in preparation for our meeting at Made by Me in august 2014. Then we decided to leave it out as it did not fit in the blue and grey color mix. Now with dress designer Judith Bech’s wedding gowns I decided to include it and design a shrug to go with it. Here is my introduction to the pattern: Voluminus hidden sand cables in a tweed mixture made of Rowan Lima and Rowan Fine Tweed, creates a divine texture for this shrug with bell cuffs worked sideways in one piece. You begin at one cuff and shape it in the round until the back where it is worked flat until the opposite sleeve. Why not lengthen the back by adding a loose back piece attached with an earring or a brooch? Make a loose reversible Keya scarf and use it as a collar for the shrug; named Keya after the bloom of a flower.

20151028 LM Ekeberg 1025The shrug comes in size: XS/S (M/L, XL/2XL), while the scarf is one size. The shrug is worked from cuff to cuff with bell shaping at each end. The cuff and sleeve is worked in the round until armhole, then worked flat across the back to the opposite sleeve where it is worked in the round to the final bind off at the cuff. Only the width varies between the different sizes, not the length. You can easily adjust the length by removing or adding pattern repeats to each sleeve if desired.

20151028 LM Ekeberg 1012Sample knitter Grete Jenssen, aka ma9 on Ravelry, knitted the shrug at her usual speed and perfection using 5.5 mm/US 9 needles. That is the recommended size for Rowan Lima but since I wanted the sand cables to pop I decided to use the same size even though the yarn is held together with the Rowan Fine Tweed. By holding the yarns together the color becomes richer and the texture even more pronounced. The yarns were generously sponsored by Rowan Yarns’ Scandinavian agent Permin.

20151028 LM Ekeberg 1007The gauge is 16 stitches and 27 rows in garter stitch using both yarns held together. I often choose two thinner yarns held together, both with good meterage/yardage to create a denser texture, popping cables and a lighter garment instead of choosing a thick yarn usually with a shorter meterage/yardage that results in a heavier garment.

20151028 LM Ekeberg 0981The loose back piece is attached using a gold brooch by Kaja Gjedebo Design at the center back of the shrug. It is knitted as a rectangle and meant to be pinned on when you need extra warmth on your lower back. An option would be to add buttonholes along the bottom of the flat back part of the shrug. In the photo above you see the scarf lying over the shrug as a collar from the back. Alexandria was ever so pleased that I kept her so warm in the cold October weather. This is one of the design that needed time to evolve, as some of them do.

Share